"Monty's" Story - The Rescue, Student Fund Raiser & Return to the Trees

“MONTY”

During the late evening hours of August 15, our Chihuahuas discovered a Red Tail Hawk near the back door of our house, on the campus of Peace Montessori School. Given that it didn’t react to our small dogs I suspected that it was most likely injured.  We checked on him later that evening and then went out to check his whereabouts as soon as the sun came up in the morning.  As I had anticipated he was still sitting on the patio, affording me the opportunity to marvel in his grace and beauty.  My son and I dearly love these magnificent birds and will often drive about looking to catch a glimpse of them.  They are very special to us and we knew immediately that we must do whatever we needed to in an effort to provide him aid.

By 7:30 that morning we were actively communicating with one of the volunteers at Soarin’ Hawk in an effort to help him.  She was working diligently to find someone to come and rescue him.  I knew within the hour that there was no one available until 11:30.  I had the opportunity to share with Jennifer just how much these birds mean to my son and me.  I tentatively asked if there were any other options.  “Do you consider yourself to be a brave person?” she asked.  “I can if I need to be,” was my reply.  She told me that she would walk me through a rescue step by step and encouraged me to help him.  I knew I couldn’t do it by myself so I enlisted the help of my dear friend Chad.  With an audience, my son, my partner, friends and co-workers Chad had him in the cage in a moment and we were off to take him to Dr. Funnell.  I knew in my heart that I been in the presence of a magnificent, beautiful animal that truly needed us.  I also knew that we were there to help him.  I will never be able to explain the impact that Monty (the name we have given him) had on me that day. 

As a Montessori teacher, I work to always teach my children the importance of caring for the global community, that one may never know who or what will need our help.  I encourage my young friends to care for not only one another, but all creatures.  To that end our school with be embarking on a fundraiser to help with the cost of rehabilitating Monty. 

In closing, it cannot be left unsaid that these magnificent birds are a gift, one that is dutifully cared for by the volunteers at Soarin’ Hawk.  I encourage every one to reach out to them and thank them for all that they do and to join us in trying to help rehabilitate these gifts of nature.  In honor of Monty, we thank you.

The Director of Peace Montessori School, New Haven, IN

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Second chance: Monty the hawk returns to trees

ROSA SALTER RODRIGUEZ | The Journal Gazette

September 19. 2016

Monty the Red-Tailed Hawk flapped off into his second-chance life Monday morning as about 80 delighted children at Peace Montessori School outside New Haven cheered on their unofficial mascot.

About three weeks ago, the bird of prey was found injured in a mini-farmyard on school grounds. School maintenance man Chad Getts captured him with a blanket, and the bird was carted off to Soarin' Hawk Raptor Rehabilitation Center in Fort Wayne, which provided step-by-step instructions over a cell phone.

A veterinarian determined the bird was suffering from gunshot wounds, one in his right wing and one in his hip. But after a bit of surgery, which saved his wing and his ability to fly, and three weeks of rehab, Monty -- brought back to the school in a blue release box -- was let go, right where he was found.

With three good flaps, he made it to a high tree limb, only to take off again for an even higher branch in a tree between a tall white pine and a hemlock, where he and his mate were known to hang out before his misfortune.

"He's huge!" said Jacob Irwin, 9, after the release. The fourth-grader has become a hawk fan after watching the birds live outside his school and was happy the bird was back and better.

"We thought he might die. We also thought that he broke his wing," he said.

rsalter@jg.net

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Peace Montessori Elementary Class Raises $200 for Monty's Surgery & Recovery !

September 19, 2016

Today the elementary class at Peace Montessori presented Soarin' Hawk with a donation of $200 that the students raised for Monty's care at Soarin' Hawk.  In a little over a month, the students got together, create and sold wrist bands and ribbon pins to raise funds to cover the cost of the surgery and rehabilitation.

We share this world with the wild creatures and we have a duty to care for and protect them.

The students spirit of caring for wildlife can be a lesson for everyone. 

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Patched up and ready to fly

Students marvel at hawk

Found injured on school grounds 4 weeks ago

Rosa Salter Rodriguez | The Journal Gazette
 
September 20, 2016

Monty the Red-Tailed Hawk flapped off into his second-chance at life Monday morning as about 80 delighted children at Peace Montessori School outside New Haven cheered for their unofficial mascot.

Click here to watch the video !!!

About four weeks ago, the bird of prey was found injured in a mini-farmyard on school grounds. School maintenance worker Chad Getts captured him with a blanket, and the bird was carted off in a dog crate to Soarin’ Hawk Raptor Rehabilitation Center in Fort Wayne, which provided step-by-step instructions for a safe capture during a phone call.

A veterinarian determined the bird was suffering from gunshot wounds, one in his right wing and one in his hip. But after a bit of surgery, which saved his wing and his ability to fly, and weeks of rehab, Monty – brought back to the school in a blue release box – was let go, right where he was found.

With three good flaps, he made it to a high tree limb, only to take off again for an even higher branch in a tree between a tall white pine and a hemlock. He and his mate were known to hang out there before his misfortune.

“He’s huge!” said Jacob Irwin, 9, after the release. The fourth-grader from Fort Wayne has become a hawk fan after watching the two birds live outside his school. He was happy the bird was back and better.

“We thought he might die. We also thought that he broke his wing,” he said.

Addilyn Ricker, 6, of Fort Wayne said she likes the birds. “They have really sharp claws and they fly really fast,” the first-grader said. “It was so scary when it flapped its wings when the person was holding him.”  

She was referring to a couple of tense moments as Soarin’ Hawk volunteer Jennifer Lanning, carried the bird to his release spot. At one point he wriggled and tried to open his wings, drawing gasps from the crowd of children.

“He wants to go!” she said. Seconds later, she released her grasp and the bird took off.

Mike Dobbs, volunteer educator and director of development for Soarin’ Hawk, said Monty is one of about 150 birds of prey – several species of hawks plus owls – that have come to the center injured this year.

The center takes in birds from around northeast Indiana, northwestern Ohio and southern Michigan.

“Our success rate is about 60 percent,” he said, adding that number counts birds able to be released into the wild, to zoos and to other raptor organizations for use in educational programs.

The birds who end up at the center usually have flown into objects, including moving cars, although quite a few young birds get injured in falls from nests, Dobbs said.

Monty was at least the second to be shot, although it is against federal law to hunt or kill hawks – and has been since 1972.  Any hawk that is shot must be reported to federal authorities, although rarely are the perpetrators ever brought to justice, he said.

When it was learned what had happened to Monty, said Carrie Kile, Peace’s co-director, it provided an opportunity to teach students about the law as well as about the birds. The students also raised $200 by making ribbon pins and bracelets and donated the money to the rehab center.

Kile said she was hopeful that Monty’s mate would return – red-tails mate for life, and although hawks are generally seasonal migrants, it appears this pair overwinters in its local territory.

Kile said she saw the female swooping down by her window on Friday; another staff member saw her fly over the parking lot on Monday.

But the female had not appeared by 2:30 p.m. Monday, although Monty was observed hunting a chipmunk and enjoying it for lunch.

The children have not yet named the female, Kile said. They named the male Monty for “Montessori,”  she said. “If they did name her, I’m sure I know what it would be – Maria,” Kile said.

That’s the first name of the founder of Montessori schools. 

rsalter@jg.net

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