Releasing rehabilitated birds back in to the wild is an amazing experience! Adult birds are typically released back from the area from which they came. They know the hunting grounds well and may even have a mate waiting for them! Orphans can be released just about anywhere there is suitable habitat for them. 

 

Young Great Horned Owl Goes Home

On September 9, 2019, St. Joe Humane Society in Mishawaka received a call about an owl entangled in a soccer net. After they secured the owl, they called the Soarin' Hawk rescue line, and volunteer Gary drove the bird to our ICU. The bird was determined to be a young great horned owl. Luckily, the young owl was not badly injured, so he went to our outdoor rehabilitation facility, where he was housed with Zeus, our educational great horned owl, to help him learn how to be an owl. After a few weeks he was transferred to a pen where it was confirmed that he could catch live prey, then his flight...Read more

Chimney Screech Goes Home

On November 3, 2019, the Soarin' Hawk rescue line received a call from Katy P. about a little screech owl that had fallen down a chimney in Columbia City. Katy and her husband were very concerned, and - when it was determined that the owl could not be rescued from the roof - they removed their fireplace insert so the owl could be rescued. As soon as the fireplace insert was removed, the owl flew around Katy's living room until he was caught by Soarin' Hawk volunteer Louie, who brought the owl to our ICU. After receiving a clean bill of health from Dr. Pat, and being observed for a couple of...Read more

Red-Tailed Hawk 04152019 Has Left the Building!

This juvenile red-tailed hawk was brought to our Immediate Care Unit on the evening of 4/15/19 by a conservation officer. It was assumed that he had suffered a car strike due to the injuries sustained. He had a ruptured crop, some blood in his mouth, and only 2 out of his 12 tail feathers were present. He was thin and quite lethargic, and his right eye was swollen shut. It took a while, but once his crop healed and he had gained flight strength, he was ready to go back to the wild, and he was released on October 20, 2019. Watch the release here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/...Read more

Red-Tailed Hawk 04152019 Has Left the Building!

This juvenile red-tailed hawk was brought to our Immediate Care Unit on the evening of 4/15/19 by a conservation officer. It was assumed that he had suffered a car strike due to the injuries he sustained. He had a ruptured crop, some blood in his mouth, and only 2 out of his 12 tail feathers. He was thin and quite lethargic, and his right eye was swollen shut. After his crop healed, we had to wait for his tail feathers to grown in, then we began helping him gain flight strength. Finally, om October 10, 2019, he was ready to go home. Watch the release here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/...Read more

Red-Tailed Hawk 07162019 Goes Home!

On July 16, 2019, a Soarin' Hawk volunteer got a call from the Allen County sheriff’s department. She drove out to Arcola Road where she found a male adult red-tailed hawk on the ground . He did not fly away. She was able to pick him up. He had been out there all day. The homeowners thought he would fly away but he never did. IHe was taken to our intensive care facility, where he perched well and was bright alert and responsive, but was very thin. Our veterinarian determined that he had an old wing fracture and puncture wounds, and he began physical therapy on his wing. He responded well to...Read more

The Cooper's Have Left the Building

On Sunday, August 4, with the help of Adam and Dick Buchanan, two juvenile Cooper's hawks left the hack box. They had been fed while living in the box for about two weeks. Once the gates were open, they took to the skies to live free. They both were orphans rescued on June 6. One, among the four from a nest that had blown down during a storm, came to us with a fractured leg and had to stay at the ICU until it healed. Its siblings, having no injuries, were able to be released earlier. The other orphan was found on the ground from an unknown reason, and was found to have no injuries. For two...Read more

A Very, Very Special Release

by Susan Hansen & Bill Oberg On August 7, we got a call around 9:15 am. There was an owl down near the airport. When we arrived we found a baby great horned owl confined in a cardboard box. There was some blood on its beak, and a bit on one talon. The caller, Don, explained that they had been working on a large metal storage building for over a year, and frequently found birds that had gotten in during the night. This morning, though, they found 2 owls, one twice the size of the other. The larger one escaped through an open window. The smaller one tried to follow several times but only...Read more
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Red-Tailed Hawk Release #10292018

On Saturday February 23, 2019 this beautiful adult red-tailed hawk was released back to its home territory in Angola, IN after spending the past four months with us recovering from car collision injuries. Those involved with its rescue were present to watch it head home!Read more
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Red-Tailed Hawk Release #09062018

We received a call on 9/6/18 about a red tail hawk on the side if the road with obvious injuries. The bird was found in Beaverdam, Ohio. The person who found the bird graciously offered to bring it to ICU. An hours drive. Upon examination it was discovered that this bird had probably been hit by a car. It had active bleeding from its ear and eyelid on the right side. Treatment with antibiotics and for probable pain was started. The Bird is now ready for RELEASE!Read more
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Red-Tailed Hawk Release #11082018

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Sharp-Shinned Hawk Release #11172018

Soarin' Hawk recently took in a Sharp-Shinned Hawk, which is very rare for us! This rehab story never made it to the headlines due to the fact that we could not find much wrong with the bird, and it stayed with us for a rather short time; so now you are recieving the story all in one. The bird stayed with us for a little over a week in the ICU, and had the privilege of being released shortly after! ICU Notes : 11-17-18 This hawk was found down on the ground by a concerned citizen. He was transported to our treatment and recovery unit where he was found to have flat flies and minor abrasions...Read more
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Barred Owl Release #03152018

After 8 months in our care this beautiful barred owl was finally released back into his forever home! Kat Ternet, Soarin’ Hawk’s vet tech, released him. It was her first release ever!Read more
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Great Horned Owl Release #08062018

Story Via Volunteer Mary Koher : This beautiful owl came into us after being struck by a vehicle. He was found to have flat flies, a broken hallux (toe) on his left foot, some vision issues and a right wing injury in the area of the wrist / elbow. The vision issues resolved themselves on their own as did the broken hallux. We continued performing physical therapy on the right wing. It did not require surgery just therapy to keep it loose. This bird was added to the creance list on October 26 th and he was proven to be a strong flyer. This continued for a few more weeks and he proved that he...Read more
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Great Horned Owl Release #05302018

This beautiful baby Great Horned Owl, whoo isn’t a baby anymore has met all of its milestones and was released today (11/15/2018) in Metea County Park. Intake Number : #05302018GHOWRead more
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Immature Bald Eagle Release

This immature eagle was successfully released in front of an estimated crowd of between 500 - 800 people. It was a beautiful day and a great tribute to our Veterans’ on this Veteran’s day! Fly free lady eagle, fly free! Pictures provided by Mark Penrod, a generous by-stander! Intake Number: #08172016BAEARead more
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