Setting Records and Finding Homes

We are always disappointed when we cannot heal an injured raptor to the point that it can be returned to the wild. But this is an exciting time for Soarin' Hawk as we have been able to find homes for a record number of birds already this year - 9! In 2018 so far we have found homes for birds as close as the Blandford Nature Center in Grand Rapids, Michigan and as far away as the Phoenix Zoo! Other placements this year are: the Talon Trust in Evansville, Indiana; the Louisville Zoo; the St. Louis Zoo; Brookgreen Gardens and Zoo in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina; and the National Aquarium in...Read more

9 Species of Raptors in ICU this week!

What a variety of raptors are hospitalized in our ICU today! We have 11 birds representing 9 species and this is not our busy season! Spring and summer typically quadruple the number of injured and orphaned raptors we receive and provide care for. Since Soarin' Hawk is primarily volunteer run, we always welcome new volunteers for a variety of opportunities including ICU. 1. A Bald Eagle: Recovering from a fractured wing. He had orthopedic surgery and is now getting Physical Therapy three times a week under anesthesia. 2. A Snowy Owl: We hope to release her next week! 3. A Great Horned Owl:...Read more

Eagle Receiving Physical Therapy [Tales from ICU]

Embedded thumbnail for Eagle Receiving Physical Therapy  [Tales from ICU]

Fractures and Euthanasia

“We had to euthanize this raptor because the fracture was not repairable” … may not make any sense to those outside of raptor rehabilitation. So let us try and explain. The end goal/requirement of wildlife rehabilitation is to release the animal back into the wild. But it must not be released with any physical impairment that would make it either unable to hunt for its own food or be more vulnerable to injury or to a predator. If an animal is not releasable back into the wild we can occasionally place a bird in qualified institution (zoo, etc.) that wants the animal. But there are even...Read more

Imping an Eagle ??? Seriously ???

Imping an eagle...not many understand what that means! Imp: as a noun this word is defined as " a mischievous child or a little devil or demon". But as a verb it means to "mend or repair" and specifically used in falconry to imp is to "graft feathers into a wing". This eagle had extensive feather damage due to feather mites. The mites leave characteristic angular lines of destruction as they damage the feathers, as seen in this first photo. (The feathers that are not damaged are ones that the eagle had replaced since we had treated her for mites.) As you can imagine, this bird could not fly...Read more

Soarin' Hawk Has a New ICU!

Soarin’ Hawk now has an ICU (intensive care unit) for extremely ill and injured raptors. Historically, the extremely ill were taken care of in volunteers’ homes. Though the people did a great job of caring for the birds, it was not ideal. Each bird would need to be put in a cage and transported for veterinary rechecks and minor procedures, which adds stress to an already sick wild animal. We could not afford to buy a scale for each volunteer to monitor the birds’ weight as well as to weigh the food the animal was being fed. A centralized facility where all the birds can be in the same room...Read more

Fractures and Euthanasia

“We had to euthanize this raptor because the fracture was not repairable” … may not make any sense to those outside of raptor rehabilitation. So let us try and explain. The end goal/requirement of wildlife rehabilitation is to release the animal back into the wild. But it must not be released with any physical impairment that would make it either unable to hunt for its own food or be more vulnerable to injury or to a predator. If an animal is not releasable back into the wild we can occasionally place a bird in qualified institution (zoo, etc.) that wants the animal. But there are even...Read more

From the Clinic

There are 3 blood parasites that affect birds. There are some human blood parasites, but fortunately they are not something we typically have to worry about in the United States. This article will cover Leucocytozoon spp. Leucocytozoon spp. commonly infects both white and red blood cells. The red arrows in the first image point to examples of a lymphocyte (white blood cell) infected with Leucocytozoon spp. The yellow arrows in the second image point to examples of normal looking lymphocytes. You can see how difficult it would be to identify the kind of cell that is infected on the left...Read more

Please welcome Katherine Tate to the Soarn Hawk Veterinary Team

Please welcome Katherine Tate, B.S.,RVT. to the Soarin’ Hawk veterinary team! Katherine joined us in June of 2017. We had just started talking about the need for a vet tech when we received an email from Katherine inquiring if we had any openings. After reading her bio, we felt that the stars had aligned. We met shortly thereafter, offered her a job, and she accepted! Kat’s story: When I first started college 7 years ago I went into human medicine. I thought I wanted to be a Physician's Assistant. After 3 years, I realized that human medicine wasn't for me, but animal medicine was. I had to...Read more

from the Clinic

Embedded thumbnail for from the Clinic

Walmart Associates make a difference.

Just a few weeks ago, 10 associates from the Walmart Distribution Center in Auburn IN dedicated their weekend in service to Soarin' Hawk. In response to our front page call for "more fish" they spent the weekend restocking our supply of fish while enjoying a day outdoors. Not only did they bring inthe fish, Walmart has a program that provides grants to non-profits, based on the number of hours that their associates donate to the community. The 83 hours contributed by these hardworking folks will provide Soarin' Hawk with a lot of fish and $1,000. Thank you Walmart associates and the Walmart...Read more

Sand Hill Crane released back to the wild

It truly takes a village. Through the combined efforts of Wildcat Creek, Indiana DNR and Soarin' Hawk, this Sand Hill Crane returns to the wild today.Read more

from the CLINIC

from the CLINIC - Bumblefoot by Katherine Tate, BS, RVT Bumblefoot is also known as Pododermatitis. Essentially, this condition is inflammation of the feet. Bumblefoot can be a management problem, but can also develop due to an injury. The cause of bumblefoot is due to the bird being in captivity for extended periods of time. This condition begins with the bird placing abnormal amounts of pressure to the feet. The unequal distribution of weight is due to inappropriately shaped perches, incorrect perch substrates, and enclosure layouts that cause the bird to injure the pads on their feet...Read more

Red-tailed Hawk nestling graduates to Hack Box

The pair of red-tailed hawk nestlings rescued in early May https://www.soarinhawk.org/birds/05072017-redtailed%20hawk-two-nestlings have graduated to Hack Boxes. What is a Hack Box? It is a man made structure that provided shelter from the elements, protection from predators, a covered balcony, yet is large enough for the birds to exercise a bit. A Hack Box also has door though which our avian care team provides food (without being seen). As the birds mature over the coming months, the door on the end of the balcony will be opened. The birds will be free to come and go as they please,...Read more
Embedded thumbnail for Red-tailed Hawk nestling graduates to Hack Box

Baby Barred Owl thrive - inspite of Mother Nature

Embedded thumbnail for Baby Barred Owl thrive - inspite of Mother Nature